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    Comanche Peak, Texas

     

    On September 19, 2008, Luminant Generation Company, LLC (Luminant) submitted an application for a construction and operation license (COL) with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to build two additional units at the nuclear power plant in Comanche Peak, Texas. The plant is located four and a half miles northwest of Glen Rose in Somervell County and about 80 miles southwest of downtown Dallas.

    Luminant Power is a subsidiary of Luminant, which is itself a subsidiary of Energy Future Holdings Corp, and operates 20 power plants in Texas: 14 gas, 5 lignite-coal, and 1 nuclear (Comanche Peak). The current plant took 21 years to build, and the two Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) currently in service at the site have a combined operating capacity of 2,300-megawatts. The new reactors would add 3,400-megawatts to the total.

    Luminant is seeking approval to build two U.S. Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (US-APWR), a reactor designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Mitsubishi applied for design certification with the NRC on December 31, 2007. The last phase of safety checks is targeted to be completed in September of 2011, and a final verdict on its design to be made sometime thereafter.

    The cost of the application process alone will add up to $200 million for Luminant, a cost Mitsubishi Heavy Industries will cover, seduced by the opportunity to buy 12% of the project in return. Though Luminant has not released a cost estimate for construction, industry standards estimates it will be between $10.2 and $17 billion, and loan guarantees will be required to cover most of it. Approval and construction time will likely take 10 years, making 2018 the best case scenario for Luminant.

    To view Luminant’s application, click here.

    If you would like to get involved in stopping the construction of new nuclear plants in Texas, please contact us and let us know how you’d like to help. We can provide you with information and strategic advice.

    For more links to fighting nuclear power in Texas, click here.

    Nuclear – TexasVox: The Voice of Public Citizen in Texas
    San Onofre Nuclear Plant Closing: A harbinger of things to come for the U.S.’s aging nuclear fleet?

    Earlier today, Southern California Edison (SCE) announced that they will retire Units 2 and 3 of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS), essentially closing the troubled nuclear power plant which is located between San Diego and Los Angeles. SONGS, which has been in operation for 45 years, may be a harbinger for the future […]


    The post San Onofre Nuclear Plant Closing: A harbinger of things to come for the U.S.’s aging nuclear fleet? appeared first on TexasVox: The Voice of Public Citizen in Texas.



    Friday, June 07, 2013 3:01:41 PM

    Foreign Ownership Could Halt Licensing of South Texas Project Nuclear Reactors

    NRC Says NINA Doesn’t Meet Their Requirements On Tuesday, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission told judges overseeing the licensing case for two proposed South Texas Project reactors that the applicant (NINA) is subject to foreign ownership control or domination requirements and does not meet the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act in this regard. This will […]


    The post Foreign Ownership Could Halt Licensing of South Texas Project Nuclear Reactors appeared first on TexasVox: The Voice of Public Citizen in Texas.



    Thursday, May 02, 2013 12:00:58 AM

    NRC MAINTAINS HEIGHTENED WATCH OVER NUCLEAR PLANTS IMPACTED BY SANDY; THREE SHUTDOWNS AND OYSTER CREEK PLANT IN ALERT

    Update:  The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said an alert at the Oyster Creek plant in Forked River, N.J., ended early Wednesday, October 31. According to an NRC press release, three reactors (Nine Mile Point 1 in Scriba, N.Y., Indian Point 3 in Buchanan, N.Y.; and Salem Unit 1 in Hancocks Bridge, N.J.) experienced shutdowns as […]


    The post NRC MAINTAINS HEIGHTENED WATCH OVER NUCLEAR PLANTS IMPACTED BY SANDY; THREE SHUTDOWNS AND OYSTER CREEK PLANT IN ALERT appeared first on TexasVox: The Voice of Public Citizen in Texas.



    Tuesday, October 30, 2012 12:12:03 PM

    Three Mile Island – Deja vu

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has reported that a reactor at Three Mile Island, the site of the nation’s worst nuclear accident, shut down unexpectedly on this afternoon when a coolant pump tripped and steam was released.  Right now they are saying the plant is stable with no impact on public health or safety. Still, this is […]


    The post Three Mile Island – Deja vu appeared first on TexasVox: The Voice of Public Citizen in Texas.



    Thursday, September 20, 2012 6:55:34 PM

    NRC Whistleblower Claims Threat To Nuclear Plants Covered Up By Regulators

    According to the Huffington Post, not one, but two, whistleblower engineers at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have accused regulators of deliberately covering up information relating to the vulnerability of U.S. nuclear power facilities that sit downstream from large dams and reservoirs and failing to act to despite being aware of the risks for years. One […]


    The post NRC Whistleblower Claims Threat To Nuclear Plants Covered Up By Regulators appeared first on TexasVox: The Voice of Public Citizen in Texas.



    Tuesday, September 18, 2012 6:00:18 PM

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